The Secret Slush Funds of Asset Forfeiture

Asset forfeiture laws don’t just allow the police to seize property they claim is connected to criminal activity; they often let the cops keep the proceeds from what they take. This profit incentive is one of the biggest problems with the practice, since it gives police an incentive to pursue petty and indefensible seizures to pad out their own budgets.

Source: The Secret Slush Funds of Asset Forfeiture

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2 Years After CBP Took His Truck Because of a Few Forgotten Bullets, Still No Hearing

Gerardo Serrano was on his way to visit his cousin in Mexico when Customs and Border Protection (CBP) agents at the border station in Eagle Pass, Texas, found a magazine containing five .380-caliber rounds in the center console of his pickup truck.

Source: 2 Years After CBP Took His Truck Because of a Few Forgotten Bullets, Still No Hearing

In Surprise Vote, House Passes Amendment to Restrict Asset Forfeiture

In a stunning move, the House of Representatives on Tuesday approved an amendment to the Make America Secure and Prosperous Appropriations Act that will roll back Attorney General Jeff Sessions’s expansion of asset forfeiture . Amendment number 126 was sponsored by a bipartisan group of nine members, led by Michigan Republican Rep.

Source: In Surprise Vote, House Passes Amendment to Restrict Asset Forfeiture

Forfeiture Loot Corrupts Justice: New at Reason

In Ohio during the 1920s, people caught with “intoxicating liquors” could be tried by rural mayors, who were paid for each conviction and authorized to impose fines that were split between the village and the state. Four decades later, mayor’s courts in Ohio were handling traffic cases, which did not reward the mayors directly but generated substantial income for their villages.

Source: Forfeiture Loot Corrupts Justice: New at Reason

Indianapolis Cops Violated the Constitution by Holding Cars for Six Months Without Filing Forfeiture Paperwork

A federal judge in Indiana issued a sharp rebuke to civil forfeiture abuse on Monday, ruling that the Indianapolis Metro Police Department may no longer hold vehicles for up to six months before deciding whether to file official forfeiture paperwork.

Source: Indianapolis Cops Violated the Constitution by Holding Cars for Six Months Without Filing Forfeiture Paperwork

Philadelphia Offers to Stop Using Seized Property to Fund Police

In an attempt to settle a federal class-action civil rights lawsuit challenging its asset forfeiture program, the city of Philadelphia is asking a judge to ban its use of forfeiture revenues to fund police and prosecutors. Civil asset forfeiture is the process that allows police to seize property they suspect is connected to criminal activity, even if they never charge the owner with a crime.

Source: Philadelphia Offers to Stop Using Seized Property to Fund Police

84% of Americans Oppose Civil Asset Forfeiture | Cato @ Liberty

https://www.cato.org/blog/84-americans-oppose-civil-asset-forfeiture

58_civilasset1.jpegEighty-four percent (84%) of Americans oppose civil asset forfeiture–police “taking a person’s money or property that is suspected to have been involved in a drug crime before the person is convicted of a crime,” according to a new Cato Institute/YouGov survey of 2,000 Americans. Only 16% think police ought to be allowed to seize property before a person is convicted.

Civil asset forfeiture is a process by which police officers seize a person’s property (e.g. their car, home, or cash) if they suspect the individual or property is involved with criminal activity. The individual does not need to be charged with, or convicted of, any crime for police to seize assets.[1] In most jurisdictions police departments may keep the property they seize or the proceeds from its sale. However, as these survey results demonstrate, most Americans oppose this practice……